7 examples of 'python convert string to variable name' in Python

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1139def _get_var_name(self, orig):
1140 name = self._resolve_possible_variable(orig)
1141 try:
1142 return self._unescape_variable_if_needed(name)
1143 except ValueError:
1144 raise RuntimeError("Invalid variable syntax '%s'." % orig)
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32def _get_varname(name):
33 return name.split('[', 1)[0]
93def variableName(name):
94 seg = name.split('_')
95 res = ""
96 no = len(seg)
97 for i in range(no):
98 if i != 0:
99 seg[i] = seg[i][0].upper() + seg[i][1:]
100 res+=seg[i]
101 return res
87@classmethod
88def convert_to_cpp_name(cls, variable_name):
89 """
90 Converts a handed over name to the corresponding gsl / c++ naming guideline.
91 In concrete terms:
92 Converts names of the form g_in'' to a compilable C++ identifier: __DDX_g_in
93 :param variable_name: a single name.
94 :type variable_name: str
95 :return: the corresponding transformed name.
96 :rtype: str
97 """
98 return NestNamesConverter.convert_to_cpp_name(variable_name)
488def get_name_from_kwarg(var):
489 """
490 Given some kwarg name, return the original variable name.
491
492 :param var: A string with a (internal) kwarg name
493 :return: The original variable name
494 """
495 return var.replace('#kwarg_', '')
292def clean_variable_name(variable_name):
293 """ Convert the variable name to a name that can be used as a template variable. """
294 return re.sub(r"[^a-zA-Z0-9_]", '', variable_name.replace(' ', '_'))
188@lru_cache(maxsize = 2**15)
189def replaceVariableName(code, oldName, newName):
190 pattern = r"([^\.\"']|^)\b{}\b".format(oldName)
191 return re.sub(pattern, r"\1{}".format(newName), code)

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